Skip to content

Personal Stories from Nepal

Click here to unfold
click here to fold

Single Mother of Three Brings Electrification to Simjung


Dhan Kumari Gurung is a 46 year old school teacher who lives in the village of Samjung in Gorkha district. She is a widow, and has to take care of her three children and her mother in law single handed. When Dhan Kumari’s husband died, he was in the process of initiating the construction of the 10.4kW Shree Hilme micro hydro project. Faced with the choice of stepping into her husband’s shoes, or seeing the project work come to a halt, Dhan Kumari decided to take on the responsibility so that her husband’s dream of village electrification would be realised. Despite numerous difficulties, Dhan Kumari successfully led the construction phase, and now that the system is running, she works as both manager and operator.
Though educated, Dhan Kumari is a woman in rural Nepal, and it is not usual for rural women to be involved in work outside of the home and family. “I was scared initially,” says Dhan Kumari, “I wasn’t sure that a single women like me with three small children could take up such a daunting task as supplying the village with electricity. I realize now that where there’s a will there’s a way.” “It was very challenging for her,” adds neighbour, Chin Maya Gurung,” people didn’t believe a woman could do such work- especially a single woman. Single women face a lot of social stigma.”

Managing to overcome a range of problems during the construction phase of the project, Dhan Kumari developed into a successful social leader. AEPC and ESAP training workshops on micro hydro system operation and management supported Dhan Kumari in the achievement of her goal. “Dhan Kumari is a role model of our society” says Sarita Gurung, chairperson of the Rural Empowerment Society (RESDTN) in Tanahun. “It is extremely challenging for a single woman from a socially excluded group, living in a rural village to manage and operate a micro hydro project in such a professional manner. In our Society, this is usually perceived as men’s work. If the people in her community view the initiative in a positive light and give her their support, they’ll be able to use the electricity to create local industry. This will make the whole project sustainable.” Dhan Kumari’s story sends a clear message to those in Nepali society who doubt the capacity of women to take the lead in the construction, management, and operation of rural micro hydro schemes.

""

 

How DANIDA creates a better framework for the people in Nepal ?

Mrs. Laxmi B.K., 40, cooks some rice with her improved cooking stove(ICS). She first heard from energy projects throughout the community that requested ICS in her village through the NGO REDA in Nepal which is supported through DANIDA. She shares her past days when she had to struggle with the smokes all around and hours of cooking in the kitchen. She is now happy given that she does not have to be in the smoky environment any longer and she can cook variety of food in a very lesser time with lesser fuelwood. The ICS project makes her life better because now the kitchen is smokeless, she can cook double with the same amount of wood at a lesser time and can cook several things at a time, the food remains hot for longer, etc.
Dharampani village, Palpa, 28th January 2012

Single Mother of Three Brings Electrification to Simjung


Dhan Kumari Gurung is a 46 year old school teacher who lives in the village of Samjung in Gorkha district. She is a widow, and has to take care of her three children and her mother in law single handed. When Dhan Kumari’s husband died, he was in the process of initiating the construction of the 10.4kW Shree Hilme micro hydro project. Faced with the choice of stepping into her husband’s shoes, or seeing the project work come to a halt, Dhan Kumari decided to take on the responsibility so that her husband’s dream of village electrification would be realised. Despite numerous difficulties, Dhan Kumari successfully led the construction phase, and now that the system is running, she works as both manager and operator.
Though educated, Dhan Kumari is a woman in rural Nepal, and it is not usual for rural women to be involved in work outside of the home and family. “I was scared initially,” says Dhan Kumari, “I wasn’t sure that a single women like me with three small children could take up such a daunting task as supplying the village with electricity. I realize now that where there’s a will there’s a way.” “It was very challenging for her,” adds neighbour, Chin Maya Gurung,” people didn’t believe a woman could do such work- especially a single woman. Single women face a lot of social stigma.”

Managing to overcome a range of problems during the construction phase of the project, Dhan Kumari developed into a successful social leader. AEPC and ESAP training workshops on micro hydro system operation and management supported Dhan Kumari in the achievement of her goal. “Dhan Kumari is a role model of our society” says Sarita Gurung, chairperson of the Rural Empowerment Society (RESDTN) in Tanahun. “It is extremely challenging for a single woman from a socially excluded group, living in a rural village to manage and operate a micro hydro project in such a professional manner. In our Society, this is usually perceived as men’s work. If the people in her community view the initiative in a positive light and give her their support, they’ll be able to use the electricity to create local industry. This will make the whole project sustainable.” Dhan Kumari’s story sends a clear message to those in Nepali society who doubt the capacity of women to take the lead in the construction, management, and operation of rural micro hydro schemes.

""

 

Click here to unfold
click here to fold